Saturday, May 20, 2006 Log Out  
 Online Journals
Online Journals Home
About Journals
Search
Browse
 Account
Account Home
Shopping Cart
Order History
Activate Access
Register
 Services
Services Home
Favorites
Alerting
ActiveSearch
 Support
Support Home
Contact Us
Downloads
Exports
  
Article Back To:  Main    Publication    Issue 

  

Israel Journal of Zoology
  Issue:  Volume 50, Number 2-3 / 2004
  Pages:  139 - 167
  URL:  Linking Options

   Special Issue: Predation Risk Compendium
  Guest Editor(s): L. Blaustein, B.P. Kotler, J.S. Brown
 
CONTEXT DEPENDENCE OF NONLETHAL EFFECTS OF A PREDATOR ON PREY GROWTH

SCOTT D. PEACOR A1 and EARL E. WERNER A2

A1 Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA and NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, 2205 Commonwealth Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA
A2 Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA

Abstract:

Predators can have a large influence on their prey through induced changes in prey phenotype. Such "nonlethal" predator effects have been abundantly demonstrated empirically in both terrestrial and aquatic systems. But the extent to which changes in species traits alter short-term responses such as growth rate or probability of survival is not clear. Here we develop models to examine the nonlethal effects of predators on prey growth. Our analyses illustrate how the nonlethal effects of predators on individual prey growth depend on environmental context; e.g., factors such as focal species density, competitor density, resource dynamics, and the timescale over which the interactions occur. This context dependence arises because of complex interactions of three mechanisms; (1) the direct negative effect of induced reduction in foraging rates, which is opposed by (2) the potential positive effects of reductions in intra- and interspecific competition, and (3) resource responses to reduced foraging. We present new empirical work, and review previous work, on larval-anuran growth that is in general support of model predictions. The framework presented here can serve to facilitate the design and interpretation of experimental results and predict how the nonlethal predator effect on prey growth in natural systems will vary over time and space.


The references of this article are secured to subscribers.


  
 Full Text Access
Full Text Secured

The full text of this article is secured to subscribers. To gain access, you may:

   Subscribe to this publication.

Subscribe

   Add this item to your shopping cart for purchase later.

Add to Shopping Cart

   Purchase this item now.

Purchase Item Now

   Log in to verify access.

Log In



  


For more information feel free to contact us:
E-Mail: laserpages@netmedia.net.il
Fax: 972-2-652-2277 Tel: 972-2-652-2226
Laser Pages
P.O. Box 35409
Jerusalem 91352, Israel
©2006 Laser Pages
All Rights Reserved.

Remote Address: 209.128.119.47 • Server: MPWEB09
HTTP User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; heritrix/1.6.0 +http://innovationblog.com)